June 2019 Hikes

Some more hikes we’ve enjoyed this spring.

Salmon Butte Trail – Mt. Hood National Forest

Technically we did this in late May, but I’m rolling it into the June hike category

The Salmon Butte Trail is 11-12 miles through the Salmon-Huckleberry Wilderness on the southern side of Mt. Hood. We went on a cool, overcast day and had the trail practically to ourselves. It is a moderate trail with a slow, steady climb. The trail meanders along a stream and old growth forests before reaching the summit where you get sweeping views of the valley and Mt. Hood (on a clear day). There were still a few patches of snow when we went in late May, but nothing covering the trail. It’s well worth a visit if you’re not looking to go too far outside of Portland and want a relatively secluded hike. 

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Hebo Lake to South Lake – Pacific City, OR

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Where to begin with the Hebo Lake Trail? This trail starts at Hebo Lake and is an 8 mile point to point to South Lake. When we hiked this, the plan was to run it twice out and back for a total of 32 miles. The first 5 miles of the hike gains 1,500 ft in a steady, unrelenting climb. There’s a steep descent after the Hebo Mountain Peak, but the brush was so overgrown by mile 6.5 that I turned around and didn’t make it to South Lake. The lookout point at the top is spectacular offering views of the valley and the Pacific Ocean and well worth the climb. If you’re in Pacific City and looking for a hike, it’s worth it to do at least the first 4 miles to the lookout. Be aware that it is probably ~75% exposed so make sure to wear sunscreen and carry plenty of water.

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Wilson River Trail

The Wilson River Trail runs for just shy of 20 miles through the Tillamook State Forest. It’s a gorgeous, shaded trail with plenty of on and off points so you can do as much or little as you want. Matt and Snickers hiked 8 miles of the trail starting at the King’s Mountain Trailhead (another great hike if you’re looking for some serious climbing), while I ran 20 as a couple of out and back loops from the Jones Creek day use area. The portion of the trail along the river is very beautiful, but does incur a lot of noise from Highway 26. Depending on which section you do, it’s an easy to moderate hike and well worth spending a day in the forest.

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PCT, Timothy Lake, and Little Crater Lake

In mid-June I set out for a training run on a portion of the PCT that my upcoming race will traverse. Starting at the Frog Lake Trailhead, I went south for 8 miles, looped around Timothy Lake, and ended at Little Crater Lake. This trail was gorgeous! The first few miles on the PCT were mostly downhill with vistas of Mt. Hood the entire way. There were a few downed trees, but they were easy enough to hop over. The trail around Timothy Lake is a 13 mile loop that is mostly flat. The day I went, there were very few people aside from a 1 mile section near a day use area. The lake itself was serene and glassy and there were amazing views of the mountain from the south. There were plenty of campsites and it would be an idyllic place to spend a summer night. I finished the day with a short jaunt to Little Crater Lake. The trail is flat and short, and the lake is worth the walk to see. While small, it is 45ft deep, crystal clear, and nestled in a wildflower meadow. If you’re looking to get out of the city for a while and don’t mind the 2 hour drive, Timothy Lake is a great destination.

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Pacific Crest Trail from Mt. Hood to Columbia River Gorge

Read a full recap here. Suffice to say, it’s not for the faint of heart. Definitely not a day trip for most, but would be a fun weekend backpacking trip.

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